Is Anesthesiologist’s experience important while inflating the endotracheal tube cuff with the right pressure?
Alkin Çolak, Cavidan Arar, Sevtap Hekimoğlu Şahin, Ali Söker, Işıl Günday, Nesrin Turan
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Abstract

Objectives: Cuff pressure in endotracheal tubes should be in the range of 26–30 cm H2O. In this study we aimed to examine whether anesthesiologist’s experience is important while inflating the endotracheal tube correctly after the intubation.
Materials and methods: The patients who were included to the study were intubated after the induction of general anesthesia. The patients were divided into 4 groups according to the training year of the anesthesia research assistant resident inflating the endotracheal tube (ET) cuff. Group I (n=64) the cuff pressure which were inflated by the first year residents; Group II (n=92) the cuff pressure which were inflated by the 2nd year residents; Group III (n=144) the cuff pressure which were inflated by the 3rd year residents; Group IV (n=93) the cuff pressure which were inflated by the 4th year residents were measured by manometer.
Results: When we compared the cases in which the cuff pressure were between 26-30cm H2O we found that the best results were in Group II and respectively in Group III and IV and the worst results were in Group I. The difference between Group II and Group I were statistically significant (p<0.05).
Conclusion: We believe that manometer should be used ET for cuff pressure setting and monitoring.

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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Article Type: Research Article

https://doi.org/10.5799/ahinjs.01.2010.03.0040

J Clin Exp Invest, 2010 - Volume 1 Issue 3, pp. 195-198

Publication date: 17 Dec 2010

Article Views: 2372

Article Downloads: 1947

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